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Sunday, March 16, 2014

" From Their View "...Tanya Smith

These recent images are presented for the first time in public by Tanya Smith. She welcomes fellow Fine Art Photographers to comment with their opinions.



"This first image, entitled 'Thorns For The Crown' was captured using a Canon EOS 30D with a Sigma 35-75 lens at F8 1/125 with an ISO 800 setting.  Part of a self-assigned photo shoot I recently did called Finding Faith.  An arrangement on the walls of an historical Episcopal church I attend occasionally, I relate it to the crown of thorns Jesus wore on the cross.  The image is post-processed in Adobe CS5  for toning and effects, and will be printed on a Fine-Art Matte paper or Arches Watercolor paper (which is one of my favorites for images like this)."









My second image is entitled 'Strength of Character'.  Canon EOS 30D - Sigma 35-75, ISO 160, F16 @ 1/125 with 18mm focal length. This old barn is surrounded by chain link fencing, prohibiting me from closer contact and forcing me to shoot from an upward perspective to avoid the distraction of the fencing.  I love the character of old buildings and saw great strength in this barn.  The image is post-processed in CS5 to achieve an infrared effect and will be printed on a Fine-Art matte photo paper.


Tanya Jacobson-Smith
For more of my work check out my FAA page http://tanya-jacobsonsmith.artistwebsites.com/


14 comments:

  1. Nice photo of the barn. It seems like you left a aura or halo around the building which is unnatural looking and suggests you enhanced the sky but left that telltale sign of your photoshop technique. The other thing I don't understand is how you made the picture at 18mm when you were using a 35-70mm lens. Last thing; giving the ISO, aperture and shutter speed used is useless information

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    1. Thank you for your comments 'Unknown'. I went back and looked at the original image and the aura is in it also...perhaps it was caused by the high-noon sunlight bouncing off of the bright silver tin roof. I didn't do anything really in regards to enhancing the sky...only some slight curves adjustments and then adjustments to the various colors when converting to black & white. Personally the 'aura' is one of the things I liked about this image...it gives it an 'otherworldly' appearance.
      As to the 18mm...I am not sure how that happened only that it is what it says in the properties of the image. Please forgive me if I posted 'useless' information...this is my first posting to this blog and I will know in the future to leave that out.

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    2. I do feel a bit of an idiot in regards to the 18mm...it seems I credited the wrong lens :) This image was actually shot with my Sigma 18-50mm lens.

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  3. Ok, I hope you'll accept some tough love.
    Although there is no right way to process an image, there are images where immediately there is a sense that the processing isn't adequate and actually damages them:in my view the case for both your images. A picture of thorns in a pot on a shelf on a wall that isn't immediately identifiable as that of a church, suffering from burned out highlights,toned or not, doesn't evoke "Thorns for a Crown ", it's just an image of thorns in a pot on a shelf on a wall with burned out highlights-toned.
    As for infra-red process in software, it often leads to over cooked photos that are appealing at first glance but become quickly irritating.In my view it's a gimmick often used to enhance otherwise lifeless images.
    Now be reassured, there isn't a photographer who hasn't neglected to step back from his or her work and posted images that they should've held back. But in my view that is what you have done. Please look at great photography.
    This tough love is not to be mean by the way, on the contrary, my wish is to be helpful.
    The web is overflowing with poor images that receive comments like " nice picture " that by any commercial or fine art standards are actually mediocre. How is that helpful saying they're nice when they aren't nice at all.
    If you really love photography, persevere and please look up fine works. Live with your work before posting it.
    Wishing you the best.

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  4. I have no problem with either 'tough love' or serious constructive critique, however, I do find it a bit un-nerving when those dishing it out do so as 'Unknown' and/or 'Anonymous' as I am neither.

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  5. Yes Tanya I understand that it is frustrating to be anonousmly critiqued ...but ultimately it's irrelevant. It doesn't matter who I am or what I do in life...what I have done is looked at your images and taken the time to share my honest opinion. Whether or not I'm any good at photography myself...or at anything else for that matter. .is not important :in this case it would only be a distraction. What is important is that you've shared two images and are receiving honest comments about them.

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    1. I submitted the 2 images to be critiqued by my peers (other Fine Art Photographers), therefore your credentials/identity is indeed relevant as far as I am concerned. You are right, it is your opinion, honest or not is questionable in my opinion because you are refusing to own it by remaining anonymous. If you have no art/photography background/connection then, in my opinion, your opinion is irrelevant to my posting of these 2 images. At this particular point in time on this posting I am looking for honest and CONSTRUCTIVE critique from MY PEERS, not the general public. But thank you for your opinion.

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  6. I would have liked to see a different angle of view of the
    Thorn flowers.it feels like a simple snapshot rather than a work of art.

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  8. Hi Tanya,
    I don't want to be negative, but you asked for comments and I totally agree with the "Anonymous" and "Unknown" comments. The Thorn picture is irrelevant and on the lower left corner is blown out. The barn is obviously overdone, there's no way that a reflection would do that halo. That's my sincere opinion, please don't take it bad, just trying to help. Keep shooting and I wish you a great success.

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    1. Thank you Alfredo. I really do not understand or know what is causing the 'halo' as it is visible in all 3 of the images I shot from that angle, and that in their original RAW state. It does become more obvious when I adjust the color sliders when converting to BW to achieve the effect I am looking for. Whatever it is, I personally like it, although I respect your opinion.
      As to the Thorn picture...it is far from 'irrelevant' to me...and again, I shot it and edited it as I did for my own personal satisfaction...perhaps it was a poor choice on my part to post it here as it is a very 'personal' image. I love the way the light falls off and the shadows created by the natural light streaming through the tall windows of the church...I created the image in camera and then adjusted the contrast and tone to create the mood I felt when observing it in person.
      I will definitely continue shooting and thank you for your well wishes.

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  9. Hi Tanya - I do think you've had rather a hard time here... I like both your images, and while I agree with some comments, I'd offer a couple of thoughts: perhaps you are relying too much on post processing, it might help to think about capturing everything you can just with the camera, esp the fall of the light and the tones of shadow; treat PS with the lightest possible touch. A bit like film!

    But I like it that you've posted such personal images, and that is really important. Perhaps your choice of titles is just a little too grandiose, and that has set people off

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Comments signed anonymous will be deleted. You should stand behind what you say.